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Surveying

Surveying
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 GATE SYLLABUS:

Importance of surveying, principles and classifications, mapping concepts, coordinate system, map projections, measurements of distance and directions, leveling, theodolite traversing, plane table surveying, errors and adjustments, curves.

JNTU SYLLABUS:

UNIT – I INTRODUCTION:
Overview of plane surveying (chain, compass and plane table), Objectives, Principles and classifications.

UNIT – II DISTANCES AND DIRECTION:
Distance measurement conventions and methods; use of chain and tape, Electronic distance measurements, Meridians, Azimuths and Bearings, declination, computation of angle.

UNIT – III LEVELING AND CONTOURING:
Concept and Terminology, Temporary and permanent adjustments- method of leveling. Characteristics and Uses of contours- methods of conducting contour surveys and their plotting.

UNIT – IV COMPUTATION OF AREAS AND VOLUMES:
Area from field notes, computation of areas along irregular boundaries and area consisting of regular boundaries. Embankments and cutting for a level section and two level sections with and without transverse slopes, determination of the capacity of reservoir, volume of barrow pits.

UNIT – V THEODOLITE:
Theodolite, description, uses and adjustments – temporary and permanent, measurement of horizontal land vertical angles. Principles of Electronic Theodolite.  Trigonometrical leveling, Traversing.

UNIT – VI TACHEOMETRIC SURVEYING:
Stadia and tangential methods of Tacheometry. Distance and Elevation formulae for Staff vertical position.

UNIT – VII Curves:
Types of curves, design and setting out – simple and compound curves.

UNIT - VIII
Introduction to geodetic surveying, Total Station and Global positioning system, Introduction to Geographic information system (GIS).

 

Speech recognition technology is used more and more for telephone applications like travel booking and information, financial account information, customer service call routing, and directory assistance. Using constrained grammar recognition, such applications can achieve remarkably high accuracy. Research and development in speech recognition technology has continued to grow as the cost for implementing such voice-activated systems has dropped and the usefulness and efficacy of these systems has improved. For example, recognition systems optimized for telephone applications can often supply information about the confidence of a particular recognition, and if the confidence is low, it can trigger the application to prompt callers to confirm or repeat their request. Furthermore, speech recognition has enabled the automation of certain applications that are not automatable using push-button interactive voice response (IVR) systems, like directory assistance and systems that allow callers to "dial" by speaking names listed in an electronic phone book.

Speaker identity is correlated with the physiological and behavioral characteristics of the speaker. These characteristics exist both in the spectral envelope (vocal tract characteristics) and in the supra-segmental features (voice source characteristics and dynamic features spanning several segments). The most common short-term spectral measurements currently used are Linear Predictive Coding (LPC)-derived cepstral coefficients and their regression coefficients. A spectral envelope reconstructed from a truncated set of cepstral coefficients is much smoother than one reconstructed from LPC coefficients.

Therefore it provides a stabler representation from one repetition to another of a particular speaker's utterances. As for the regression coefficients, typically the first- and second-order coefficients are extracted at every frame period to represent the spectral dynamics. These coefficients are derivatives of the time functions of the cepstral coefficients and are respectively called the delta- and delta-delta-cepstral coefficients.

 

Speech recognition technology is used more and more for telephone applications like travel booking and information, financial account information, customer service call routing, and directory assistance. Using constrained grammar recognition, such applications can achieve remarkably high accuracy. Research and development in speech recognition technology has continued to grow as the cost for implementing such voice-activated systems has dropped and the usefulness and efficacy of these systems has improved. For example, recognition systems optimized for telephone applications can often supply information about the confidence of a particular recognition, and if the confidence is low, it can trigger the application to prompt callers to confirm or repeat their request. Furthermore, speech recognition has enabled the automation of certain applications that are not automatable using push-button interactive voice response (IVR) systems, like directory assistance and systems that allow callers to "dial" by speaking names listed in an electronic phone book.

Speaker identity is correlated with the physiological and behavioral characteristics of the speaker. These characteristics exist both in the spectral envelope (vocal tract characteristics) and in the supra-segmental features (voice source characteristics and dynamic features spanning several segments). The most common short-term spectral measurements currently used are Linear Predictive Coding (LPC)-derived cepstral coefficients and their regression coefficients. A spectral envelope reconstructed from a truncated set of cepstral coefficients is much smoother than one reconstructed from LPC coefficients.

Therefore it provides a stabler representation from one repetition to another of a particular speaker's utterances. As for the regression coefficients, typically the first- and second-order coefficients are extracted at every frame period to represent the spectral dynamics. These coefficients are derivatives of the time functions of the cepstral coefficients and are respectively called the delta- and delta-delta-cepstral coefficients.

 

TEXT BOOKS:
1. “Surveying (Vol – 1, 2 & 3), by B.C.Punmia, Ashok Kumar Jain and Arun Kumar Jain - Laxmi Publications (P) ltd., NewDelhi
2. Duggal S K, “Surveying (Vol – 1 & 2), Tata Mc.Graw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd. New Delhi, 2004.
3. Surveying and levelling by R. Subramanian, Oxford university press, New Delhi.

REFERENCES:
1. Arthur R Benton and Philip J Taety, Elements of Plane Surying, McGraw Hill – 2000
2. Arror K R “Surveying Vol 1, 2 & 3), Standard Book House, Delhi, 2004
3. Chandra A M, “Plane Surveying”, New age International Pvt. Ltd., Publishers, New Delhi, 2002.
4. Chandra A M, “Higher Surveying”, New age International Pvt. Ltd., Publishers, New Delhi, 2002.